Classroom Management or Classroom Environment?

As the school year begins I’ve been thinking a lot about classroom environment. Our district uses the Danielson Framework as part of our teacher evaluation and one of the four domains identified is Classroom Environment. As an aside, when The Framework was first published it was designed to be a reflective tool not an evaluative one.  If you are not familiar with The Framework for Teaching, Charlotte Danielson identifies four domains of teacher responsibility. Domain 2, Classroom Environment, includes five components that make up this domain.

danielson

For some reason whenever I hear “classroom management” I immediately think of procedures, student behavior, and physical space. Do the students know where the supplies are? Are they efficiently transitioning between learning activities? Do students know the procedure for when they return from an absence?  That’s just the business of learning.

Two components I want to focus on are the first two from Danielson’s list: 1) respect and rapport and 2) a culture for learning. I LOVE how the wording below captures the essence of both while merges the two ideas into one. It even addresses the expectations of both teacher and student as it relates to learning:

respect learning

I came across this language three or four years ago at a summer technology workshop hosted by our district. The words never escaped me. Kate Kieres traveled from Pennsylvania to lead the PD and referred to it several times.

When sharing this with students we obviously discuss examples of respect, but instead of posting a list of do’s or don’ts,  I prefer to capture it in question form as the basis for our classroom norms.

Creating a culture for learning requires students to be in an engaging, collaborative environment that empowers all learners. That’s my responsibility. When students ask…

What am I learning from others?

When students consciously ask themselves, What am I learning from others? attention is immediately drawn to the learning experience. It demands critical thinking and processing. It invites inquiry, debate, and feedback. An example could be a simple turn and talk where students share a problem solving strategy, but the caveat is the intentional self reflection while the conversation is taking place, “What am I learning from you?”

How am I contributing to the learning of others?

Similarly, students should be cognizant of how they contribute to the learning of others. Either in pairs, small groups, or whole class discussion it is my responsibility to create a learning environment where every student voice is valued.  That means every student needs to be into a position where they can participate and not feel they have nothing to offer. A group-worthy task with roles and responsibilities or an open middle problem are ways to give students the opportunity to contribute to others’ learning.

As classroom norms

My support classes are only 30 minutes. Time is precious. By referring to the norms What are you learning from others? and How are you contributing to the learning of others? I can quickly redirect behavior. It makes the statement that this is a learning environment and these are the expectations, on both the students’ part and mine.

 

 

Intervention Goals and Goal Setting

I’m so grateful to @jreulbach and her blog  for resurrecting #SundayFunday.   My position as a 6-8 math interventionist (a relatively new position) has prevented me from blogging regularly but I hope the weekly prompts will get me to write more often. My responsibilities continue to evolve, but my main projects are providing grades 6-8 homeroom math support, co-teaching four classes, and overseeing our Title I after school math program.

Our homeroom intervention program is a work in progress. It is NOT a formal class, but the identified students (below 30% percentile MAP and teacher recommendation) are scheduled to attend math support twice weekly. The two previous years, support time was dedicated to re-teaching and supporting the daily classroom instruction. This year I will also be targeting specific skills for intervention.

One goal I have for myself is to spend time identifying quality intervention programs that best suit our students. One resource I’ll be looking at more closely is this document from Hanover Research. I’m also quite fond of Marilyn Burns Math Reasoning Inventory .  I’m not sure if my district will be purchasing a program or if we will be creating our own. Either way the work is cut out for me. If you have a favorite or have struggled with a particular set of resources please add your thoughts in the comments.

Along those lines, one goal I have for my homeroom support students is for them to set their own goals and monitor their progress. I created this google spreadsheet for them to complete.

Below is a screenshot. The student would fill in the blue and green and the graph would self generate.

Goal setting

Students can use the continuous learner characteristics as the basis for the goal setting plan.

If the electronic version becomes too cumbersome I guess I’ll go back to paper.

I’m interested in learning how goal setting has worked in your classroom as well so please chime in!