Skip to content

Creating confident, competent learners

August 7, 2014

At one point in last night’s #Eduread conversation on “A Framework for Culturally Responsive Teaching” the topic turned to choice–with a particular focus on homework problems, tasks, and assessments. After some pondering, I’m now thinking we just scratched the surface when talking about choice.

choice

 

There’s another type of choice  that Miss Calcul8 pointed out in her intervention post. We’re now below the surface, but that still doesn’t include all the other choices students make throughout the day.

What does choice afford us?

Choice empowers us.

My point is that if we want our students to become confident, competent learners we  must allow them to develop a sense personal power–providing them with the resources, the opportunity, and the capability to influence the circumstances of their own life.

So how do we empower students to believe they can:

  1. do what they set out to do
  2. handle what’s ahead of them
  3. get whatever they need in order to do what they must
  4. feel they are in charge of their life, can make decisions, and solve their own problems

Certainly we can’t do it alone, but we can do our part to help students build a positive mental model of themselves. A model where the student feels he has a mission and purpose, knows where he’s headed, knows how to organize himself, etc.

In the coming weeks I’ll be sharing how I’m applying particular strategies in my classroom as I attempt to create confident, competent learners.

 

 

About these ads
2 Comments leave one →
  1. August 8, 2014 8:00 am

    Hi Mary,

    Allowing opportunities for student choice is important. What that choices are seems to be one of the determining factors to consider. I’m looking forward to hearing about the different strategies you use this school year.

    • August 8, 2014 9:31 am

      I’m resurrecting notes from a class I took a while ago, Successful Teaching of Acceptance and Responsibility and intend to share how I implement the strategies. I used it off and on, but never with fidelity. If I stick with the plan the students will benefit.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 356 other followers

%d bloggers like this: